Solutions:

1. President Roosevelt was related to a man who had served as President of the United States before him. Who was that man, and how were the two men related?
ANSWER: Franklin D. Roosevelt was the fifth cousin of Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States.

URL:http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/franklindroosevelt

2. How long did it take workers to complete construction of the Empire State Building?
ANSWER: Construction of the Empire State Building was completed in one year, 45 days. It took 7 million man-hours of labor!

URL:http://legacy.www.nypl.org/research/chss/spe/art/photo/hinex/empire/about.html

3. When Jesse Owens was born, he wasn't named "Jesse." Nor was he named "John Cleveland" or "James Cleveland," as recorded in many biographies of the track hero. What name did Jesse's father give to him at birth?
ANSWER: Jesse's father gave him the name "J.C." at birth. When the boy went to school, friends called him "Jesse" and the name stuck. Later, they gave him the name John Cleveland. "It's wrong, when J.C. is all I named him," said Jesse's father.

URL:http://www.jesseowens.com/about/

4. The designer of the Golden Gate Bridge worked many hours to convince citizens that the bridge could be built and that it could pay for itself with tolls paid by travelers. Who was that famous bridge designer?
ANSWER: Joseph Baermann Strauss

URL:http://www.goldengate.org/

5. During the Depression years, people who were lucky enough to have jobs were paid very low wages. About how much was an accountant paid each week during the Depression? About how much is an accountant paid each week today?
ANSWER: Today, an accountant earns about $700 a week. During the Depression, an accountant was paid about $45.00 a week.

URL:http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-54463_19268_20778-52530--,00.html

6. Most of the places on the Monopoly board game were named by the game's inventor for places in a real U.S. city. What city is that?  
ANSWER: Atlantic City, New Jersey

URL: http://www.adena.com/adena/mo/mo02.htm

7. What was pictured on the cover of the very first issue of LIFE magazine, on November 23, 1936?
ANSWER: The Fort Peck Dam (in Montana), photographed by Margaret Bourke-White, appeared on the first cover of LIFE magazine.

URL:http://www.life.com/image/50504953

8. The pop-up toaster was one of the household conveniences that became commonplace in kitchens across America in the 1930s. "This amazing new invention makes perfect toast every time!" proclaimed ads in the Saturday Evening Post. "Without turning! Without burning!" The pop-up toaster was invented some years before it became popular. In what year was it invented, and by whom?
ANSWER:
The patent for the pop-up toaster was filed on May 29, 1919, by Charles Strite.
URL:http://www.toaster.org/

9. How much money were Siegel and Shuster paid for each page of their first Superman comic book?
ANSWER: Siegel and Shuster were paid $10 per page.

URL:http://www.greatkrypton.com/superman/creators.php

10. Unlike First Ladies before her, Eleanor Roosevelt spoke her opinions freely in lectures, radio broadcasts, and in a daily newspaper column. What was her newspaper column called?
ANSWER: Eleanor Roosevelt's daily newspaper column was called "My Day."

URL:http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/first-ladies/eleanorroosevelt